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Parallelization efficiency versus stochasticity in simulation reaction–diffusion by cellular automata

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Abstract

Due to a growing interest in chemical and biological phenomena, simulation of reaction–diffusion processes on micro level becomes urgently wanted. Asynchronous cellular automata (ACA) are promising mathematical models to be used as a base for creating computer simulation programs, which gives reason for investigation of the models capability. In particular, micro-level simulation requires to deal with very large ACA size. So, parallel implementation is inevitable, and, hence, achieving good parallelization efficiency is essential. Since parallelization efficiency depends on stochasticity (the degree of randomness) of the process under simulation, it is important to investigate their relations in order to create methods of developing ACA models with proper stochasticity values. In the paper the interrelation between stochasticity and parallelization efficiency is studied in the context of reaction–diffusion processes simulation on supercomputer with distributed memory. The results are illustrated by simulation a Large-scale process of wave front propagation.

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Author information

Correspondence to Olga Bandman.

Additional information

Supported by Presidium of Russian Academy of Sciences, Program 15-2016.

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Bandman, O. Parallelization efficiency versus stochasticity in simulation reaction–diffusion by cellular automata. J Supercomput 73, 687–699 (2017). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11227-016-1775-y

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Keywords

  • Reaction–diffusion phenomena
  • Asynchronous cellular automata
  • Stochasic cellular automata
  • Block-synchronous mode of operation
  • Parallel implementation
  • Parallelization efficiency