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Studies in Philosophy and Education

, Volume 38, Issue 2, pp 163–176 | Cite as

Revaluing Leisure in Philosophy and Education

  • Givanni M. Ildefonso-SanchezEmail author
Article
  • 48 Downloads

Abstract

This paper shows that philosophy and contemplation are integral parts of leisure (scholé) and of a fully conscious educative experience. Through examination of the concepts of philosophy, the philosopher, and contemplation, it will be proposed that leisure is a necessary condition for philosophy and for education. To conceptually bring together philosophy and education with leisure, the act of teaching as “an overflow of contemplation,” following Yves Simon’s definition, will be considered. Supporting the philosophical view of education as constituting an inward transformation of the individual, from which he or she can better regard the world and his or her place in it, a serious theory of education rooted on leisure is a timely and valuable idea to consider.

Keywords

Ancient philosophy Leisure Education theory Teacher education programs Contemplation 

Notes

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature B.V. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.LaGuardia Community CollegeLong Island CityUSA

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