Studies in Philosophy and Education

, Volume 37, Issue 3, pp 215–229 | Cite as

The Racialized Body of the Educator and the Ethic of Hospitality: The Potential for Social Justice Education Re-visited

Article

Abstract

Derridean hospitality is seen to undergird ethical teacher–student interactions. However, hospitality is marked by three aporias that signal incommensurable and irreducible ways of being and responding that need to be held together in tension without eventual synthesis. Due to the sociopolitical materiality of race and the phenomenological difference that constitutes racialized bodies, educators of color in interaction with white students are called to live the aporetic tensions that characterize hospitality in distinctive ways that are not currently emphasized in the discourse on the educator’s responsibility as it is informed by an ethic of hospitality. The asymmetrical nature of hospitality is reconfigured through the terms of eros and hospitality’s link to education aimed at social justice is posited to be stronger than is currently suggested in the educational theory literature.

Keywords

Hospitality Derrida Ethics Desire Racialized bodies Materiality Aporia Whiteness White privilege 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V., part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Philosophical Foundations of Education, Ruth S. Ammon School of EducationAdelphi UniversityGarden CityUSA

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