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Foundations of Academic Freedom: Making New Sense of Some Aging Arguments

  • Liviu Andreescu
Article

Abstract

The article distinguishes between the various arguments traditionally offered as justifications for the principle of academic freedom. Four main arguments are identified, three consequentialist in nature (the argument from truth, the democratic argument, the argument from autonomy), and one nonconsequentialist (a variant of the autonomy argument). The article also concentrates on the specific form these arguments must take in order to establish academic freedom as a principle distinct from the more general principles of freedom of expression and intellectual freedom.

Keywords

Academic freedom University functions Marketplace of ideas Professional autonomy 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Spiru Haret UniversityBucharestRomania

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