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Studies in Philosophy and Education

, Volume 27, Issue 6, pp 433–448 | Cite as

The Educational Psychology of Self-Regulation: A Conceptual and Critical Analysis

  • Jack Martin
  • Ann-Marie McLellan
Article

Abstract

The multiplicity of definitions and conceptions of self-regulation that typifies contemporary research on self-regulation in psychology and educational psychology is examined. This examination is followed by critical analyses of theory and research in educational psychology that reveal not only conceptual confusions, but misunderstandings of conceptual versus empirical issues, individualistic biases to the detriment of an adequate consideration of social and cultural contexts, and a tendency to reify psychological states and processes as ontologically foundational to self-regulation. The essay concludes with a consideration of educational research and intervention in the area of students’ self-regulated learning in terms of the scientific and professional interests of psychologists and educators, and the disguised manipulation of student self-surveillance in the service of the institutional mandates of schools.

Keywords

Self-regulation Self-regulated learning Conceptual analysis Critical analysis 

Notes

Acknowledgement

Work on this article was supported by Grant #410-2205-1308 from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of PsychologySimon Fraser UniversityBurnabyCanada
  2. 2.Faculty of EducationSimon Fraser UniversityBurnabyCanada

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