Studies in Philosophy and Education

, Volume 27, Issue 5, pp 313–333 | Cite as

Women’s proper place and student-centered pedagogy

Article

Abstract

Student-centered pedagogy has been embraced by many feminist practitioners and educational theorists as an antidote to more “traditional” or “masculinist” forms of classroom relations, epistemological constructs, and theories of self. I will show that the margin-center schema, student-centered pedagogy’s foundational metaphor, undermines feminist projects when applied to teacher-student relations. Although the margin-center schema has been a useful diagnostic tool in feminist theory, it operates prescriptively in student-centered pedagogy. Student-centered pedagogy designates teachers’ “proper place” at the margins of classroom life, a place that echoes bygone visions of domestic femininity. This paper is simultaneously a critique of student-centered pedagogy and a recuperative project to dislodge the work of John Dewey from the teacher-centered/student-centered binary.

Keywords

Student-centered pedagogy Feminism John Dewey Progressive education Teachers & teaching 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science + Business Media B.V. 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Education DepartmentBowdoin CollegeBrunswickUSA
  2. 2.PortlandUSA

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