Michelson Interferometer for Global High-Resolution Thermospheric Imaging (MIGHTI): Instrument Design and Calibration

  • Christoph R. Englert
  • John M. Harlander
  • Charles M. Brown
  • Kenneth D. Marr
  • Ian J. Miller
  • J. Eloise Stump
  • Jed Hancock
  • James Q. Peterson
  • Jay Kumler
  • William H. Morrow
  • Thomas A. Mooney
  • Scott Ellis
  • Stephen B. Mende
  • Stewart E. Harris
  • Michael H. Stevens
  • Jonathan J. Makela
  • Brian J. Harding
  • Thomas J. Immel
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s11214-017-0358-4

Cite this article as:
Englert, C.R., Harlander, J.M., Brown, C.M. et al. Space Sci Rev (2017). doi:10.1007/s11214-017-0358-4
Part of the following topical collections:
  1. The Ionospheric Connection Explorer (ICON) mission

Abstract

The Michelson Interferometer for Global High-resolution Thermospheric Imaging (MIGHTI) instrument was built for launch and operation on the NASA Ionospheric Connection Explorer (ICON) mission. The instrument was designed to measure thermospheric horizontal wind velocity profiles and thermospheric temperature in altitude regions between 90 km and 300 km, during day and night. For the wind measurements it uses two perpendicular fields of view pointed at the Earth’s limb, observing the Doppler shift of the atomic oxygen red and green lines at 630.0 nm and 557.7 nm wavelength. The wavelength shift is measured using field-widened, temperature compensated Doppler Asymmetric Spatial Heterodyne (DASH) spectrometers, employing low order échelle gratings operating at two different orders for the different atmospheric lines. The temperature measurement is accomplished by a multichannel photometric measurement of the spectral shape of the molecular oxygen A-band around 762 nm wavelength. For each field of view, the signals of the two oxygen lines and the A-band are detected on different regions of a single, cooled, frame transfer charge coupled device (CCD) detector. On-board calibration sources are used to periodically quantify thermal drifts, simultaneously with observing the atmosphere. The MIGHTI requirements, the resulting instrument design and the calibration are described.

Keywords

ICON Explorer mission Thermospheric wind Thermospheric temperature Limb sounding Spatial Heterodyne Spectroscopy 

Funding information

Funder NameGrant NumberFunding Note
National Aeronautics and Space Administration
  • NNG12FA42I
  • NNG12FA45C

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht (outside the USA) 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Christoph R. Englert
    • 1
  • John M. Harlander
    • 2
  • Charles M. Brown
    • 1
  • Kenneth D. Marr
    • 1
  • Ian J. Miller
    • 3
  • J. Eloise Stump
    • 4
  • Jed Hancock
    • 5
  • James Q. Peterson
    • 5
  • Jay Kumler
    • 6
  • William H. Morrow
    • 7
  • Thomas A. Mooney
    • 8
  • Scott Ellis
    • 9
  • Stephen B. Mende
    • 10
  • Stewart E. Harris
    • 10
  • Michael H. Stevens
    • 1
  • Jonathan J. Makela
    • 11
  • Brian J. Harding
    • 11
  • Thomas J. Immel
    • 10
  1. 1.Space Science DivisionU.S. Naval Research LaboratoryWashingtonUSA
  2. 2.Space Systems Research CorporationAlexandriaUSA
  3. 3.LightMachinery Inc.NepeanCanada
  4. 4.Orbital/ATKBeltsvilleUSA
  5. 5.Space Dynamics LaboratoryLoganUSA
  6. 6.Jenoptik Optical Systems LLCJupiterUSA
  7. 7.Resonance Ltd.BarrieCanada
  8. 8.Materion CorporationWestfordUSA
  9. 9.Photon EngineeringTucsonUSA
  10. 10.Space Sciences LaboratoryUniversity of California-BerkeleyBerkeleyUSA
  11. 11.Department of Electrical and Computer EngineeringUniversity of Illinois at Urbana-ChampaignUrbanaUSA

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