Space Science Reviews

, Volume 162, Issue 1–4, pp 85–111

Recent Results from Titan’s Ionosphere

  • A. J. Coates
  • J.-E. Wahlund
  • K. Ågren
  • N. Edberg
  • J. Cui
  • A. Wellbrock
  • K. Szego
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s11214-011-9826-4

Cite this article as:
Coates, A.J., Wahlund, JE., Ågren, K. et al. Space Sci Rev (2011) 162: 85. doi:10.1007/s11214-011-9826-4

Abstract

Titan has the most significant atmosphere of any moon in the solar system, with a pressure at the surface larger than the Earth’s. It also has a significant ionosphere, which is usually immersed in Saturn’s magnetosphere. Occasionally it exits into Saturn’s magnetosheath. In this paper we review several recent advances in our understanding of Titan’s ionosphere, and present some comparisons with the other unmagnetized objects Mars and Venus. We present aspects of the ionospheric structure, chemistry, electrodynamic coupling and transport processes. We also review observations of ionospheric photoelectrons at Titan, Mars and Venus. Where appropriate, we mention the effects on ionospheric escape.

Keywords

Ionosphere Titan Mars Venus 

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. J. Coates
    • 1
  • J.-E. Wahlund
    • 2
  • K. Ågren
    • 2
  • N. Edberg
    • 2
  • J. Cui
    • 3
  • A. Wellbrock
    • 1
  • K. Szego
    • 4
  1. 1.Department of Space and Climate Physics, Mullard Space Science LaboratoryUniversity College LondonHolmbury St. Mary, DorkingUK
  2. 2.Swedish Institute of Space PhysicsUppsalaSweden
  3. 3.Department of Astronomy & Key Laboratory of Modern Astronomy and Astrophysics in Ministry of EducationNanjing UniversityNanjingChina
  4. 4.Research Institute for Particle and Nuclear PhysicsHungarian Academy of Sciences, KFKI-RMKIBudapestHungary

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