Space Science Reviews

, Volume 146, Issue 1–4, pp 207–234 | Cite as

The Interstellar Boundary Explorer Science Operations Center

  • N. A. Schwadron
  • G. Crew
  • R. Vanderspek
  • F. Allegrini
  • M. Bzowski
  • R. DeMagistre
  • G. Dunn
  • H. Funsten
  • S. A. Fuselier
  • K. Goodrich
  • M. Gruntman
  • J. Hanley
  • J. Heerikuisen
  • D. Heirtlzer
  • P. Janzen
  • H. Kucharek
  • C. Loeffler
  • K. Mashburn
  • K. Maynard
  • D. J. McComas
  • E. Moebius
  • C. Prested
  • B. Randol
  • D. Reisenfeld
  • M. Reno
  • E. Roelof
  • P. Wu
Article

Abstract

The Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) Science Operations Center is responsible for supporting analysis of IBEX data, generating special payload command procedures, delivering the IBEX data products, and building the global heliospheric maps of energetic neutral atoms (ENAs) in collaboration with the IBEX team. We describe here the data products and flow, the sensor responses to ENA fluxes, the heliospheric transmission of ENAs (from 100 AU to 1 AU), and the process of building global maps of the heliosphere. The vast majority of IBEX Science Operations Center (ISOC) tools are complete, and the ISOC is in a remarkable state of readiness due to extensive reviews, tests, rehearsals, long hours, and support from the payload teams. The software has been designed specifically to support considerable flexibility in the process of building global flux maps. Therefore, as we discover the fundamental properties of the interstellar interaction, the ISOC will iteratively improve its pipeline software, and, subsequently, the heliospheric flux maps that will provide a keystone for our global understanding of the solar wind’s interaction with the interstellar medium. The ISOC looks forward to the next chapter of the IBEX mission, as the tools we have developed will be used in partnership with the IBEX team and the scientific community over the coming years to define our global understanding of the solar wind’s interaction with the local interstellar medium.

Keywords

Solar wind Termination shock Interstellar boundaries Interstellar medium Energetic neutral atoms 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • N. A. Schwadron
    • 1
  • G. Crew
    • 2
  • R. Vanderspek
    • 2
  • F. Allegrini
    • 5
  • M. Bzowski
    • 6
  • R. DeMagistre
    • 7
  • G. Dunn
    • 14
  • H. Funsten
    • 10
  • S. A. Fuselier
    • 12
  • K. Goodrich
    • 1
  • M. Gruntman
    • 8
  • J. Hanley
    • 5
  • J. Heerikuisen
    • 9
  • D. Heirtlzer
    • 13
  • P. Janzen
    • 11
  • H. Kucharek
    • 13
  • C. Loeffler
    • 5
  • K. Mashburn
    • 4
  • K. Maynard
    • 1
  • D. J. McComas
    • 5
  • E. Moebius
    • 13
  • C. Prested
    • 1
  • B. Randol
    • 5
  • D. Reisenfeld
    • 11
  • M. Reno
    • 3
  • E. Roelof
    • 7
  • P. Wu
    • 1
  1. 1.Boston UniversityBostonUSA
  2. 2.MIT Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space ResearchCambridgeUSA
  3. 3.Austin Mission ConsultingAustinUSA
  4. 4.Montana State UniversityMissoulaUSA
  5. 5.Southwest Research InstituteSan AntonioUSA
  6. 6.Space Research Centre PASWarsawPoland
  7. 7.JHU/APLLaurelUSA
  8. 8.Astronautics and Space Technology Division, USC Viterbi School of EngineeringUniversity of Southern CaliforniaLos AngelesUSA
  9. 9.Institute of Geophysics and Planetary PhysicsUniversity of CaliforniaRiversideUSA
  10. 10.ISR Division, MSB241Los Alamos National LaboratoryLos AlamosUSA
  11. 11.Dept. of Physics and AstronomyUniversity of MontanaMissoulaUSA
  12. 12.Space Physics Dept.Lockheed Martin Advanced Technology Center, Dept. ADCSPalo AltoUSA
  13. 13.Space Science Center and Dept. of PhysicsUniversity of New HampshireDurhamUSA
  14. 14.Southwest Research InstituteSan AntonioUSA

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