Space Science Reviews

, Volume 117, Issue 1, pp 269–295

Expectations for Infrared Spectroscopy of 9P/Tempel 1 from Deep Impact

  • Jessica M. Sunshine
  • Michael F. A’Hearn
  • Olivier Groussin
  • Lucy A. McFadden
  • Kenneth P. Klaasen
  • Peter H. Schultz
  • Carey M. Lisse
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s11214-005-3388-2

Cite this article as:
Sunshine, J.M., A’Hearn, M.F., Groussin, O. et al. Space Sci Rev (2005) 117: 269. doi:10.1007/s11214-005-3388-2

Abstract

The science payload on the Deep Impact mission includes a 1.05–4.8 μm infrared spectrometer with a spectral resolution ranging from R∼200–900. The Deep Impact IR spectrometer was designed to optimize, within engineering and cost constraints, observations of the dust, gas, and nucleus of 9P/Tempel 1. The wavelength range includes absorption and emission features from ices, silicates, organics, and many gases that are known to be, or anticipated to be, present on comets. The expected data will provide measurements at previously unseen spatial resolution before, during, and after our cratering experiment at the comet 9P/Tempel 1. This article explores the unique aspects of the Deep Impact IR spectrometer experiment, presents a range of expectations for spectral data of 9P/Tempel 1, and summarizes the specific science objectives at each phase of the mission.

Keywords

coma comets Deep Impact infrared spectroscopy nucleus Tempel 1 

Copyright information

© Springer Science + Business Media, Inc. 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jessica M. Sunshine
    • 1
  • Michael F. A’Hearn
    • 2
  • Olivier Groussin
    • 2
  • Lucy A. McFadden
    • 2
  • Kenneth P. Klaasen
    • 3
  • Peter H. Schultz
    • 4
  • Carey M. Lisse
    • 2
  1. 1.Science Applications International CorporationChantillyU.S.A.
  2. 2.Department of AstronomyUniversity of MarylandCollege ParkU.S.A.
  3. 3.Jet Propulsion LaboratoryCalifornia Institute of TechnologyPasadenaU.S.A.
  4. 4.Department of Geological SciencesBrown UniversityProvidenceU.S.A.

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