Space Science Reviews

, Volume 115, Issue 1–4, pp 71–110

Radar: The Cassini Titan Radar Mapper

  • C. Elachi
  • M. D. Allison
  • L. Borgarelli
  • P. Encrenaz
  • E. Im
  • M. A. Janssen
  • W. T. K. Johnson
  • R. L. Kirk
  • R. D. Lorenz
  • J. I. Lunine
  • D. O. Muhleman
  • S. J. Ostro
  • G. Picardi
  • F. Posa
  • C. G. Rapley
  • L. E. Roth
  • R. Seu
  • L. A. Soderblom
  • S. Vetrella
  • S. D. Wall
  • C. A. Wood
  • H. A. Zebker
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s11214-004-1438-9

Cite this article as:
Elachi, C., Allison, M.D., Borgarelli, L. et al. Space Sci Rev (2004) 115: 71. doi:10.1007/s11214-004-1438-9

Abstract

The Cassini RADAR instrument is a multimode 13.8 GHz multiple-beam sensor that can operate as a synthetic-aperture radar (SAR) imager, altimeter, scatterometer, and radiometer. The principal objective of the RADAR is to map the surface of Titan. This will be done in the imaging, scatterometer, and radiometer modes. The RADAR altimeter data will provide information on relative elevations in selected areas. Surfaces of the Saturn’s icy satellites will be explored utilizing the RADAR radiometer and scatterometer modes. Saturn’s atmosphere and rings will be probed in the radiometer mode only. The instrument is a joint development by JPL/NASA and ASI. The RADAR design features significant autonomy and data compression capabilities. It is expected that the instrument will detect surfaces with backscatter coefficient as low as −40 dB.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. Elachi
    • 1
  • M. D. Allison
    • 2
  • L. Borgarelli
    • 3
  • P. Encrenaz
    • 4
  • E. Im
    • 1
  • M. A. Janssen
    • 1
  • W. T. K. Johnson
    • 1
  • R. L. Kirk
    • 5
  • R. D. Lorenz
    • 6
  • J. I. Lunine
    • 6
  • D. O. Muhleman
    • 7
  • S. J. Ostro
    • 1
  • G. Picardi
    • 8
  • F. Posa
    • 9
  • C. G. Rapley
    • 10
  • L. E. Roth
    • 1
  • R. Seu
    • 8
  • L. A. Soderblom
    • 5
  • S. Vetrella
    • 11
  • S. D. Wall
    • 1
  • C. A. Wood
    • 12
  • H. A. Zebker
    • 13
  1. 1.Jet Propulsion LaboratoryCalifornia Institute of TechnologyPasadenaU.S.A.
  2. 2.Goddard Institute for Space StudiesNational Aeronautics and Space AdministrationNew YorkU.S.A.
  3. 3.Alenia AerospazioRomeItaly
  4. 4.Observatoire de ParisMeudonFrance
  5. 5.U. S. Geological SurveyFlagstaffU.S.A.
  6. 6.Lunar and Planetary LaboratoryUniversity of ArizonaTucsonU.S.A.
  7. 7.Division of Geological and Planetary SciencesCalifornia Institute of TechnologyPasadenaU.S.A.
  8. 8.Universit’a La SapienzaRomeItaly
  9. 9.Dip. Interateneo di FisicaPolitecnico di BariBariItaly
  10. 10.British Antarctic SurveyCambridgeU.K.
  11. 11.Facolt’a di IngegneriaNaplesItaly
  12. 12.University of North DakotaGrand ForksU.S.A.
  13. 13.Stanford UniversityStanfordU.S.A.

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