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Studies in East European Thought

, Volume 68, Issue 2–3, pp 229–239 | Cite as

A progress report on the ongoing Heidegger reception

  • Tom RockmoreEmail author
Article
  • 153 Downloads

Abstract

Philosophy, which does not begin again, always unfolds against the background of the ongoing philosophical tradition, which it needs to interpret. I argue that Heidegger’s theories, like all philosophical theories, can neither be reduced to, nor separated from, the historical context. In that sense they are like all other philosophical views, perhaps in theory ahistorical but in practice historical, hence always bound up with and inseparable from their historical moment. If, as I believe, Heidegger’s theories led him in part toward National Socialism, there is no alternative, if philosophy is to survive in a meaningful sense, to rejecting those aspects of his position, which must now be considered as simply and wholly dead, in favor of other aspects of Heidegger’s thinking that, if they are still living, can possibly be saved.

Keywords

Heidegger National Socialism the Heidegger Reception Being and Time Schwarze Hefte (The Black Notebooks) 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of PhilosophyPeking UniversityBeijingChina

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