Advertisement

Social Justice Research

, Volume 18, Issue 3, pp 335–347 | Cite as

Cracking Through Hegemonic Ideology: The Logic of Formal Justice

  • Jane Mansbridge
Article

Abstract

In this analysis I argue for the independent effects on social change of the internal logic of formal justice. Institutionally, oppositional ideas that challenge the legitimacy of a hegemonic system emerge in “safe spaces” that subordinate groups create within a culture dominated by hegemonic ideas. The oppositional ideas derive in part from an existing informal culture of opposition, access to repertories of contention, and favorable openings in the political system. In addition, however, these ideas are often propelled independently by the logic of formal justice, in which, when the reasons for separate treatment have been discredited, equality is the default option. The analysis demonstrates the power of this logic and suggests that it spreads through the mechanism of “organized activist” variation and “everyday activist” selection.

Keywords

Hegemony legitimacy justice social movements evolution 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Allen, P. (1970). Free space: A perspective on the small group in women's liberation [Times Change, New York]. In Kodet, A., Levine, E., and Rapone, A. (eds.), Radical Feminism, 1973, Quadrangle, NewYork, pp. 271–279 [abridged].Google Scholar
  2. Babcock, L., and Loewenstein, R. (1997). Explaining bargaining impasse: The role of self-serving biases. J. Econ. Perspect. 11: 109–126.Google Scholar
  3. Benn, S. I., and Peters, R. S. (1959). The Principles of Political Thought, Free Press, New York.Google Scholar
  4. Berlin, I. (l955–1956). Equality. Proc. Aristotelian Soc. 56: 301–326.Google Scholar
  5. Foucault, M. [1977] 1980. Powers and strategies. In Gordon, C. (ed.), Power/Knowledge: Selected Interviews and Other Writings 1972–1977, Pantheon, New York.Google Scholar
  6. Gramsci, A. ([1929–1935] 1971). In Hoare, Q., and Smith, G. (trans. and eds.), Selections From the Prison Notebooks, International, New York.Google Scholar
  7. Groch, S. (2001). Free spaces: Creating oppositional consciousness in the disability rights movement. In Mansbridge, J. J., and Morris, A. (eds.), Oppositional Consciousness: The Subjective Roots of Social Protest, University of Chicago Press, Chicago.Google Scholar
  8. Habermas, J. ([1981] 1986). The Theory of Communicative Action, Vol. I: Reason and the Rationalization of Society (McCarthy, T., trans.), Beacon, Boston.Google Scholar
  9. Habermas, J. ([l962] 1989). The Structural Transformation of the Public Sphere (Burger, T., and Lattimore, F., Trans.), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA.Google Scholar
  10. Jasper, J. M. (1997). The Art of Moral Protest, University of Chicago Press, Chicago.Google Scholar
  11. Mansbridge, J. J. (1990). Beyond Self-Interest, University of Chicago Press, Chicago.Google Scholar
  12. Mansbridge, J. J. (2001a). The making of oppositional consciousness. In Mansbridge, J. J., and Morris, A. (eds.), Oppositional Consciousness: The Subjective Roots of Social Protest, University of Chicago Press, Chicago.Google Scholar
  13. Mansbridge, J. J. (2001b). Complicating oppositional consciousness. In Mansbridge, J. J., and Morris, A. (eds.), Oppositional Consciousness: The Subjective Roots of Social Protest, University of Chicago Press, Chicago.Google Scholar
  14. Mansbridge, J. J. (forthcoming). Everyday Feminism, MS.Google Scholar
  15. Mansbridge, J. J., and Flaster, K. (in press). “The cultural politics of everyday discourse: The case of ‘male chauvinist.”’ Crit. Soc. 32(2).Google Scholar
  16. Mansbridge, J. J., and Morris, A. (2001). Oppositional Consciousness: The Subjective Roots of Social Protest, University of Chicago Press, Chicago.Google Scholar
  17. Marx, K., and Engels, F. ([l848] 1954). The Communist Manifesto, Regnery, Chicago.Google Scholar
  18. Mill, J. S. [1859] (1974). On Liberty, Pelican, New York.Google Scholar
  19. Morris, A., and Braine, N. (2001). Social movements and oppositional consciousness. In Mansbridge, J. J., and Morris, A. (eds.), Oppositional Consciousness: The Subjective Roots of Social Protest, University of Chicago Press, Chicago.Google Scholar
  20. Przeworski, A., and Sprague, J. (1986). Paper Stones: A History of Electoral Socialism, University of Chicago Press, Chicago.Google Scholar
  21. Rawls, J. (l971). A Theory of Justice, Harvard University Press, Cambridge, MA.Google Scholar
  22. Rogers, E. M. (2003). Diffusion of Innovations, 5th edn., Free Press, New York.Google Scholar
  23. Scott, J. C. (l990). Domination and the Arts of Resistance: Hidden Transcripts, Yale University Press, New Haven, CT.Google Scholar
  24. Tarrow, S. G. (1998). Power in Movement: Social Movements and Contentious Politics, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK.Google Scholar
  25. Teske, N. (1997). Political Activists in America: The Identity Construction Model of Political Participation, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK.Google Scholar
  26. Thompson, E. P. (1966 [1963]). The Making of the English Working Class, Vintage, New York.Google Scholar
  27. Tilly, C. (1978). From Mobilization to Revolution, McGraw-Hill, New York.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science + Business Media, Inc. 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Kennedy School of GovernmentHarvard UniversityCambridge

Personalised recommendations