Solar System Research

, Volume 39, Issue 5, pp 343–373 | Cite as

Construction of Martian Interior Model

  • V. N. Zharkov
  • T. V. Gudkova
Article

Abstract

We present the results of extensive numerical modeling of the Martian interior. Yoder et al. in 2003 reported a mean moment of inertia of Mars that was somewhat smaller than the previously used value and the Love number k2 obtained from observations of solar tides on Mars. These values of k2 and the mean moment of inertia impose a strong new constraint on the model of the planet. The models of the Martian interior are elastic, while k2 contains both elastic and inelastic components. We thoroughly examined the problem of partitioning the Love number k2 into elastic and inelastic components. The information necessary to construct models of the planet (observation data, choice of a chemical model, and the cosmogonic aspect of the problem) are discussed in the introduction. The model of the planet comprises four submodels—a model of the outer porous layer, a model of the consolidated crust, a model of the silicate mantle, and a core model. We estimated the possible content of hydrogen in the core of Mars. The following parameters were varied while constructing the models: the ferric number of the mantle (Fe#) and the sulfur and hydrogen content in the core. We used experimental data concerning the pressure and temperature dependence of elastic properties of minerals and the information about the behavior of Fe(γ-Fe ), FeS, FeH, and their mixtures at high P and T. The model density, pressure, temperature, and compressional and shear velocities are given as functions of the planetary radius. The trial model M13 has the following parameters: Fe#=0.20; 14 wt % of sulfur in the core; 50 mol % of hydrogen in the core; the core mass is 20.9 wt %; the core radius is 1699 km; the pressure at the mantle-core boundary is 20.4 GPa; the crust thickness is 50 km; Fe is 25.6 wt %; the Fe/Si weight ratio is 1.58, and there is no perovskite layer. The model gives a radius of the Martian core within 1600–1820 km while ≥30 mol % of hydrogen is incorporated into the core. When the inelasticity of the Martian interior is taken into account, the Love number k2 increases by several thousandths; therefore, the model radius of the planetary core increases as well. The prognostic value of the Chandler period of Mars is 199.5 days, including one day due to inelasticity. Finally, we calculated parameters of the equilibrium figure of Mars for the M13 model: J20 = 1.82 × 10−3, J40 = −7.79 × 10−6, ec-mD = 1/242.3 (the dynamical flattening of the core-mantle boundary).

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Copyright information

© MAIK "Nauka/Interperiodica" 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • V. N. Zharkov
    • 1
  • T. V. Gudkova
    • 1
  1. 1.Schmidt Institute of Physics of the EarthRussian Academy of SciencesMoscowRussia

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