Solar Physics

, Volume 263, Issue 1–2, pp 105–119

Response of the Solar Atmosphere to the Emergence of ‘Serpentine’ Magnetic Field

  • L. K. Harra
  • T. Magara
  • H. Hara
  • S. Tsuneta
  • T. J. Okamoto
  • A. J. Wallace
Article

Abstract

Active region magnetic flux that emerges to the photosphere from below will show complexity in the structure, with many small-scale fragmented features appearing in between the main bipole and then disappearing. Some fragments seen will be absorbed into the main polarities and others seem to cancel with opposite magnetic field. In this paper we investigate the response of the corona to the behaviour of these small fragments and whether energy through reconnection will be transported into the corona. In order to investigate this we analyse data from the Hinode space mission during flux emergence on 1 – 2 December 2006. At the initial stages of flux emergence several small-scale enhancements (of only a few pixels size) are seen in the coronal line widths and diffuse coronal emission exists. The magnetic flux emerges as a fragmented structure, and coronal loops appear above these structures or close to them. These loops are large-scale structures – most small-scale features predominantly stay within the chromosphere or at the edges of the flux emergence. The most distinctive feature in the Doppler velocity is a strong ring of coronal outflows around the edge of the emerging flux region on the eastern side which is either due to reconnection or compression of the structure. This feature lasts for many hours and is seen in many wavelengths. We discuss the implications of this feature in terms of the onset of persistent outflows from an active region that could contribute to the slow solar wind.

Keywords

Active regions Emerging flux 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • L. K. Harra
    • 1
  • T. Magara
    • 2
  • H. Hara
    • 2
  • S. Tsuneta
    • 2
  • T. J. Okamoto
    • 2
  • A. J. Wallace
    • 1
  1. 1.UCL-Mullard Space Science LaboratoryDorkingUK
  2. 2.National Astronomical Observatory of JapanTokyoJapan

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