Solar Physics

, Volume 254, Issue 2, pp 325–344

Multispacecraft Observations of Magnetic Clouds and Their Solar Origins between 19 and 23 May 2007

  • E. K. J. Kilpua
  • P. C. Liewer
  • C. Farrugia
  • J. G. Luhmann
  • C. Möstl
  • Y. Li
  • Y. Liu
  • B. J. Lynch
  • C. T. Russell
  • A. Vourlidas
  • M. H. Acuna
  • A. B. Galvin
  • D. Larson
  • J. A. Sauvaud
Open Access
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s11207-008-9300-y

Cite this article as:
Kilpua, E.K.J., Liewer, P.C., Farrugia, C. et al. Sol Phys (2009) 254: 325. doi:10.1007/s11207-008-9300-y

Abstract

We analyze a series of complex interplanetary events and their solar origins that occurred between 19 and 23 May 2007 using observations by the STEREO and Wind satellites. The analyses demonstrate the new opportunities offered by the STEREO multispacecraft configuration for diagnosing the structure of in situ events and relating them to their solar sources. The investigated period was characterized by two high-speed solar wind streams and magnetic clouds observed in the vicinity of the sector boundary. The observing satellites were separated by a longitudinal distance comparable to the typical radial extent of magnetic clouds at 1 AU (fraction of an AU), and, indeed, clear differences were evident in the records from these spacecraft. Two partial-halo coronal mass ejections (CMEs) were launched from the same active region less than a day apart, the first on 19 May and the second on 20 May 2007. The clear signatures of the magnetic cloud associated with the first CME were observed by STEREO B and Wind while only STEREO A recorded clear signatures of the magnetic cloud associated with the latter CME. Both magnetic clouds appeared to have interacted strongly with the ambient solar wind and the data showed evidence that they were a part of the coronal streamer belt. Wind and STEREO B also recorded a shocklike disturbance propagating inside a magnetic cloud that compressed the field and plasma at the cloud’s trailing portion. The results illustrate how distant multisatellite observations can reveal the complex structure of the extension of the coronal streamer into interplanetary space even during the solar activity minimum.

Keywords

Magnetic cloud Solar wind Coronal mass ejection Helmet streamer 
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© The Author(s) 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • E. K. J. Kilpua
    • 1
    • 2
  • P. C. Liewer
    • 3
  • C. Farrugia
    • 4
  • J. G. Luhmann
    • 1
  • C. Möstl
    • 5
    • 6
  • Y. Li
    • 1
  • Y. Liu
    • 1
  • B. J. Lynch
    • 1
  • C. T. Russell
    • 7
  • A. Vourlidas
    • 8
  • M. H. Acuna
    • 9
  • A. B. Galvin
    • 4
  • D. Larson
    • 1
  • J. A. Sauvaud
    • 10
  1. 1.Space Sciences LaboratoryUniversity of CaliforniaBerkeleyUSA
  2. 2.Department of Physical Sciences, Theoretical Physics DivisionUniversity of HelsinkiHelsinkiFinland
  3. 3.Jet Propulsion LaboratoryCalifornia Institute of TechnologyPasadenaUSA
  4. 4.Institute for the Study of Earth, Oceans, and SpaceUniversity of New HampshireDurhamUSA
  5. 5.Institute of PhysicsUniversity of GrazGrazAustria
  6. 6.Space Research InstituteAustrian Academy of SciencesGrazAustria
  7. 7.Institute of Geophysics and Planetary PhysicsUCLALos AngelesUSA
  8. 8.Solar Physics Branch, Naval Research LaboratoryWashingtonUSA
  9. 9.NASA/Goddard Space Flight CenterGreenbeltUSA
  10. 10.CESR/CNRSToulouseFrance

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