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Solar Physics

, Volume 230, Issue 1–2, pp 295–324 | Cite as

Solar–Stellar Irradiance Comparison Experiment II (Solstice II): Examination of the Solar–Stellar Comparison Technique

  • Martin SnowEmail author
  • William E. Mcclintock
  • Gary Rottman
  • Thomas N. Woods
Article

Abstract

The Solar–Stellar Irradiance Comparison Experiment (SOLSTICE) measures the solar spectral irradiance from 115 to 320 nm with a resolution of 0.1 nm. The Sun and stars are both observed with the same optics and detector, changing only the apertures and integration times. Pre-launch calibration at SURF allows us to measure both with an absolute accuracy of 5%. The in-flight sensitivity degradation is measured relative to a set of stable, early-type stars. The ensemble of stars form a calibration reference standard that is stable to better than 1% over timescales of centuries. The stellar irradiances are repeatedly observed on a grid of wavelengths and our goal is to measure changes in the absolute sensitivity of the instrument at the 0.5% per year level. This paper describes the details of the observing technique and discusses the level of success in achieving design goals.

Keywords

Integration Time Comparison Experiment Design Goal Absolute Accuracy Spectral Irradiance 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science + Business Media, Inc. 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Martin Snow
    • 1
    Email author
  • William E. Mcclintock
    • 1
  • Gary Rottman
    • 1
  • Thomas N. Woods
    • 1
  1. 1.Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space PhysicsUniversity of ColoradoBoulderU.S.A.

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