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Social Indicators Research

, Volume 124, Issue 2, pp 671–681 | Cite as

Social Support and Affect Balance Mediate the Association Between Forgiveness and Life Satisfaction

  • Haidong ZhuEmail author
Article

Abstract

The present study aimed at analyzing the important role of forgiveness in life satisfaction and to extend the previous literature by investigating the potential mediating effects of social support and affect balance in this relationship. Self-report measures of forgiveness, social support, positive affect, negative affect and life satisfaction were administrated to 430 Chinese university students. Path analysis indicated that forgiveness exerted its indirect effect on life satisfaction through the mediating effects of social support and affect balance and the three-path mediating effect of social support–affect balance. Furthermore, a multi-group analysis showed that the mediational model was not moderated by gender. Therefore, this study makes a contribution to the complex nature of the association between forgiveness and life satisfaction.

Keywords

Forgiveness Social support Affect balance Life satisfaction 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.State Key Laboratory of Cognitive Neuroscience and LearningIDG/McGovern Institute for Brain ResearchBeijingChina
  2. 2.Normal CollegeShihezi UniversityShiheziChina

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