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Social Indicators Research

, Volume 114, Issue 3, pp 1361–1369 | Cite as

Affective Mediators of the Influence of Gratitude on Life Satisfaction in Late Adolescence

  • Peizhen Sun
  • Feng KongEmail author
Article

Abstract

The aim of this study is to examine the mediation effects of positive affect and negative affect on the link between gratitude and life satisfaction in late adolescence. Three hundred and fifty-four Chinese university students were asked to conduct the Gratitude Questionnaire, the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule, and the Satisfaction with Life Scale. Structural equation modeling analyses supported fully mediators of positive affect and negative affect of the association between gratitude and life satisfaction. Furthermore, a multi-group analysis found that females with low negative affect scores were more likely to get greater life satisfaction than males, whereas males with high gratitude scores were more likely to get more positive affect than females. The significance and limitations of the present findings are discussed.

Keywords

Gratitude Life satisfaction Affect Subjective well-being 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This study was supported by Humanity and Social Science Youth Foundation of Ministry of Education of China (11YJC190019). Electronic mail concerning this study should be addressed to Dr. Feng Kong, kongfeng87@126.com.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of Education ScienceJiangsu Normal UniversityXuzhouChina
  2. 2.State Key Laboratory of Cognitive Neuroscience and LearningBeijing Normal UniversityBeijingChina

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