Advertisement

Social Indicators Research

, Volume 111, Issue 1, pp 97–115 | Cite as

Quality of Life Satisfaction among Workers and Non-Workers in Uruguay

  • Néstor GandelmanEmail author
  • Giorgina Piani
Article

Abstract

In this paper we use data from a population survey on quality of life dimensions conducted in Uruguay to analyze the self reported well-being among workers and non workers. Along with the literature, we find that the probability of being happy is greater for workers than non-workers. Specifically, we find evidence that workers tend to be more satisfied with their economic situation and heath, but less content with their leisure time. A number of personal and family characteristics were identified to play a role in explaining the differences in reported satisfaction between the two groups: age, gender, family size, having a life partner. Although, the self reported satisfaction with the family situation seems to be similar for workers and non-workers.

Keywords

Quality of life Happiness Workers Less developed countries Uruguay 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The authors gratefully acknowledge the financial support provided by the Inter-American Development Bank to conduct the Quality of life satisfaction survey.

References

  1. Ajzen, I., & Fishbein, M. (1980). Understanding attitudes and predicting social behavior. Hall: Prentice.Google Scholar
  2. Blanchflower, B. V. R., & Oswald, A. J. (2002). Well-being over time in Britain and the USA. Journal of Public Economics, 88, 1359–1386.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Blanchflower, B. V. R., & Oswald, A. J. (2004). Money, sex and happiness: An empirical study. Scandinavian Journal of Economics, 106, 393–415.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Böckerman, P., & Ilmakunnas, P. (2005). Elusive effects of unemployment on happiness. Social Indicators Research, 79, 159–169.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Bouazzaoui, B., & Mullet, E. (2002). Employment and family as determinants of anticipated life satisfaction: Contrasting young adults’ and elderly people’s viewpoints. Journal of Happiness Studies, 3, 129–152.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Bouazzaoui, B., & Mullet, E. (2005). Employment and family as determinants of anticipated life satisfaction: Contrasting European and Maghrebi people’s viewpoints. Journal of Happiness Studies, 6, 161–185.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Clark, A. E. (2001). Unemployment as a social norm: Psychological evidence from panel data. Journal of Labor Economics, 21(2), 289–322.Google Scholar
  8. Clark, A. E., & Oswald, A. J. (1994). Unhappiness and unemployment. The Economic Journal, 104(424), 648–659.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Darity, W., Jr., & Goldsmith, A. H. (1996). Social psychology, unemployment and macroeconomics. Journal of Economic Perspectives, 10(1), 121–140.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Diener, E. D., Sandvik, E. D., Seidlitz, L., & Diener, M. (1993). The relationship between income and subjective well-being: Relative or absolute? Social Indicators Research, 28, 195–223.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Dockery, A. (2003). Happiness, life satisfaction and the role of work: Evidence from two Australian surveys. In E. Carlson (Ed.), The full employment imperative: Proceedings refereed papers (pp. 77–95), AUst: CofFEE.Google Scholar
  12. Drobnič, S., Beham, B., & Präg, P. (2010). Good job, good life? Working conditions and quality of life in Europe. Social Indicator Research, 99(2), 205–225.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Frey, B. S., & Stutzer, A. (2001). What can economists learn from happiness research? Journal of Economic Literature, 40, 402–435.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Gandelman, N., & Hernández-Murillo, R. (2009). The impact of inflation and unemployment on subjective personal and country evaluations, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis Review, 91(3), 107–126.Google Scholar
  15. Moulton, B. (1987). Diagnosis for group effects in regression analysis. Journal of Business and Economic Statistics, 5, 275–282.Google Scholar
  16. Oswald, A. J. (1997). Happiness and economic performance. Economic Journal, 107, 1831–1875.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. Pittau, M. G., Zelli, R., & Gelman, A. (2010). Economic disparities and life satisfaction in European regions. Social Indicators Research, 96(2), 339–361.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. Ross, C., & Bird, C. (1994a). Sex stratification and health lifestyle: Consequences from men’s and women’s perceived health. Journal of Health and Social Behavior, 35(2), 161–178.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. Ross, C., & Bird, C. (1994b). Sex stratification and health lifestyle: Consequences from men’s and women’s perceived health. Journal of Health and Social Behavior, 35(2), 161–178.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. Sirgy, M., Efraty, D., Siegel, P., & Jin Lee, D. (2001). A new measure of quality of work life (QWL) based on need satisfaction and spillover theories. Social Indicators Research, 55, 241–302.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. Stutzer, A., & Lalive, R. (2004). The role of social work norms in job searching and subjective well-being. Journal of the European Economic Association, 2(4), 696–719.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. Sudman, S., & Bradburn, N. (1982). Asking questions: A practical guide to questionnaire design. Jossey: Bass Inc.Google Scholar
  23. Taylor, C. (1993). El multiculturalismo y la política del reconocimiento. Distrito Federal, México: Fondo de Cultura Económica.Google Scholar
  24. Transparency International. (2011). Corruption perception index 2011. Germany.Google Scholar
  25. Van Praag, B., & Ferrer-i-Carbonell, A. (2008). Happiness quantified: A satisfaction calculus approach. New York: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  26. Veenhoven, R. (1991). Is happiness relative? Social Indicators Research, 24, 1–34.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  27. Verbrugge, L. M. (1985). Gender and Health: An update on hypotheses and evidence. Journal of Health and Social Behavior, 26(3), 156–182.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  28. Winkelmann, R. (2006). Unemployment, social capital and subjective well-being. Discussion paper series. IZA DP no. 2346.Google Scholar
  29. Winkelmann, L., & Winkelmann, R. (1994). Why are unemployed so unhappy? Evidence from panel data. Economica, 65, 1–15.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Universidad ORT UruguayMontevideoUruguay
  2. 2.Universidad de la RepúblicaMontevideoUruguay

Personalised recommendations