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Social Indicators Research

, Volume 110, Issue 1, pp 271–279 | Cite as

Loneliness and Self-Esteem as Mediators Between Social Support and Life Satisfaction in Late Adolescence

  • Feng Kong
  • Xuqun You
Article

Abstract

This study examined both the mediation effects of loneliness and self-esteem for the relationship between social support and life satisfaction. Three hundred and eighty nine Chinese college students, ranging in age from 17 to 25 (M = 20.39), completed the emotional and social loneliness scale, the self-esteem scale, the satisfaction with life scale and measure of social support. Structural equation modeling showed full mediation effects of loneliness and self-esteem between social support and life satisfaction. The final model also revealed a significant path from social support through loneliness and self-esteem to life satisfaction. Furthermore, a multi-group analysis found that the paths did not differ across sexes. The findings provided the external validity for the full mediation effects of loneliness and self-esteem and valuable evidence for more complicated relations among the variables.

Keywords

Late adolescence Loneliness Self-esteem Social support Life satisfaction 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of PsychologyShaanxi Normal UniversityXi’anPeople’s Republic of China

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