Social Indicators Research

, Volume 95, Issue 3, pp 437–453

Children’s Resilience-Related Beliefs as a Predictor of Positive Child Development in the Face of Adversities: Implications for Interventions to Enhance Children’s Quality of Life

  • Tak-yan Lee
  • Wai-man Kwong
  • Chau-kiu Cheung
  • Michael Ungar
  • Maria Y. L. Cheung
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s11205-009-9530-x

Cite this article as:
Lee, T., Kwong, W., Cheung, C. et al. Soc Indic Res (2010) 95: 437. doi:10.1007/s11205-009-9530-x

Abstract

This paper reports the findings of a longitudinal childhood resilience study which investigated the relationship between resilience-related beliefs and positive child development. Three waves of data collection (T1, T2, and T3) were completed in January 2005, July 2005, and January 2006 with a sample of 843 grade 4 pupils, drawn from six primary schools in Hong Kong, and their parents or guardians. At T1, parents/guardians responded to a 24-item inventory of life adversities affecting their children since birth; at T1 and T3, they completed a 25-item Parental Assessment of Child’s Habit, which provided parental evaluation of children’s performance at home and in school. At T1, T2, and T3, children responded to a 58-item Child and Youth Resilience Measure, a 9-item scale on Chinese cultural beliefs about adversity, and an 11-item Chinese Resilience Measure for Children and Adolescents in Hong Kong. Regression analyses, based on linear mixed models, controlling for gender, T1 and T2 scores, personal variables, and random effects of schools, were conducted to test and validate the hypothesis that children’s resilience beliefs are predictive of positive child development, and that this predictive relationship is stronger with increasing adversity in children’s lives. Implications of these findings for the development of resilience-based interventions to enhance the quality of life of children facing adversities are examined.

Keywords

Adversity Resilience Positive child development Behavioral quality of life Chinese children 

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tak-yan Lee
    • 1
  • Wai-man Kwong
    • 1
  • Chau-kiu Cheung
    • 1
  • Michael Ungar
    • 2
  • Maria Y. L. Cheung
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Applied Social StudiesCity University of Hong KongKowloonChina
  2. 2.Maritime School of Social WorkDalhousie UniversityHalifaxCanada
  3. 3.Faculty of Social WorkUniversity of ManitobaWinnipegCanada

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