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Social Indicators Research

, Volume 87, Issue 1, pp 83–109 | Cite as

Subjective Well-being Among Young People in Transition to Adulthood

  • Eileen TrzcinskiEmail author
  • Elke Holst
Article

Abstract

This study used a nationally representative sample of young people in Germany from the German Socio-Economic Panel to examine how demographic and socio-economic characteristics of the young persons and their parents, personality traits of the young persons, quality and quantity of relationships, the parent's level of life satisfaction, and other measures of satisfaction for the young person are related to the initial assessment of life satisfaction by the individual at the critical point of transition from adolescence to adulthood. The results indicated that consistency existed across different domains of satisfaction, specifically satisfaction with life and satisfaction with grades. A strong pattern of association was also observed between the subjective well-being of the adolescents and variables that measured different dimensions of the quality and quantity of interpersonal relationships, including relationships with parents.

Keywords

Life satisfaction Early adulthood Subjective well-being Intergenerational life satisfaction 

Notes

Acknowledgements

The authors wish to thank an anonymous reviewer, Gert Wagner, Martin Kroh, Stephen Jenkins and participants at the DIW Seminar Series and at the Cornell University Policy Analyses and Management Seminar Series for helpful comments on an earlier version of this article. All remaining errors and deficiencies are of course the authors’ own responsibility.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of Social WorkWayne State UniversityDetroitUSA
  2. 2.SOEP German Institute for Economic ResearchBerlinGermany

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