Social Indicators Research

, Volume 83, Issue 1, pp 149–176 | Cite as

Native American kids: American Indian children’s well-being indicators for the nation and two states

Article

Abstract

American Indian/Alaska Native well-being, survival-based data are rare. This study explores the question of whether or not it is possible to produce such well-being information using secondary data sources. The answer is yes, with some limitations. Hence, Native American data for 10 well-being indicators nationally and for New Mexico and South Dakota, using a model like Kids Count (Annie E. Casey Foundation: 2003a, 2001 KIDS COUNT Data Book: State profiles of child well-being (Annie E. Casey Foundation, Baltimore, MD)) are reported; thereby reducing the gap in survival indicators for U.S. Indigenous children and youths. Comparisons between all children and American Indian children demonstrate that Native American children have comparatively worse well-being rates at the national level and in South Dakota, whereas New Mexico Native kids compare favorably to their non-Native peers. Policy recommendations conclude the paper.

Key words

American Indian/Alaska Native children youths families Native Americans American Indians risk factors AI/AN child well-being AI/AN high school dropouts AI/AN child health indicators AI/AN child economic indicators poverty indicator measures outcomes AI/AN survival indicators 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Sociology and Social Work, College of Social and Behavioral SciencesNorthern Arizona UniversityFlagstaffUSA

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