Social Indicators Research

, Volume 83, Issue 1, pp 55–85 | Cite as

Longitudinal indicators of the social context of families: beyond the snapshot

Article

Abstract

Longitudinal indicators are measures of an individual or family behavior, interaction, attitude, or value that are assessed consistently or comparably across multiple points in time and cumulated over time. Examples include the percentage of time a family lived in poverty or the proportion of childhood a person lived in a single-parent family. Longitudinal indicators reflect exposure not at a “snapshot” moment but over the lifecourse and may also be more reliable assessments of the family environment or experience. We highlight potential longitudinal indicators and discuss methodological issues.

Key words

child indicators family context family well-being indicators longitudinal data 

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Notes

Acknowledgements

This paper was produced under contract no. HHS-100-01-0011 with the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, under a sub-contract to Mathematica Policy Research. Reviews by ASPE staff, Laura Lippman, and Chris Ross are gratefully acknowledged.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation U.S Department of Health and Human ServiceWashingtonUSA

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