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Remembering Janet Taylor Spence (1923–2015)

Abstract

Janet Taylor Spence was a history-making figure in professional psychology and in the study of gender. In the period between her birth in 1923 and her death in 2015, vast changes took place in both domains, and Janet Spence was at the center of both. This issue of Sex Roles is dedicated to her life and work, providing a perspective and an accounting of the contributions that she made to our field. The set of papers included here chronicle Janet’s career path, evaluate the impact of her work in the areas of anxiety and of gender, recount memories from her colleagues and students, and in a closing article, analyze her place in the larger historical domain of women in psychology.

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References

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Acknowledgements

Earlier versions of the papers by Herts and Bielock, Eagly and Wood, and Foss were presented at a symposium in honor of Janet Spence, which was held at the annual convention of the Association for Psychological Science in Chicago, May 2015.

Author information

Correspondence to Kay Deaux.

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My article, “Remembering Janet Taylor Spence”, is based on my own knowledge and experience and did not involve any human participation/animal research, nor are there any conflicts of interest involved.

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Deaux, K. Remembering Janet Taylor Spence (1923–2015). Sex Roles 77, 713–717 (2017). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11199-017-0834-z

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Keywords

  • Feminist psychology
  • History of psychology
  • Biography
  • Gender studies