Sex Roles

, 64:875

Effects of Gender and Confrontation on Attributions of Female-Perpetrated Intimate Partner Violence

  • Deborah L. Rhatigan
  • Cindy Stewart
  • Todd M. Moore
Original Article

DOI: 10.1007/s11199-011-9951-2

Cite this article as:
Rhatigan, D.L., Stewart, C. & Moore, T.M. Sex Roles (2011) 64: 875. doi:10.1007/s11199-011-9951-2

Abstract

The present study examined the effects of perpetrator gender, victim confrontation, observer gender, and observer exposure to violence on attributions of blame and responsibility for partner violence. Data were collected from 728 college-aged students enrolled at two southeastern universities in the United States. Results demonstrated gendered biases among both male and female respondents. Men and women attributed less responsibility and blame to female perpetrators than male perpetrators, especially if the perpetrator was provoked. Moreover, exposure to violence was important for predicting attributions, and some of the evidence for observer effects were reduced to non-significance once these variables were added to the model.

Keywords

Intimate partner violence Female perpetrators Responsibility and blame attributions Societal tolerance 

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Deborah L. Rhatigan
    • 1
  • Cindy Stewart
    • 2
  • Todd M. Moore
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of TennesseeKnoxvilleUSA
  2. 2.Department of Social SciencesUniversity of Houston-DowntownHoustonUSA

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