Sex Roles

, Volume 60, Issue 9–10, pp 669–681 | Cite as

Patient–Provider Communication About Sexual Health: The Relationship with Gender, Age, Gender-Stereotypical Beliefs, and Perceptions of Communication Inappropriateness

  • Tara M. Emmers-Sommer
  • Sarah Nebel
  • Mae-Li Allison
  • Michele L. Cannella
  • Desiree Cartmill
  • Sarah Ewing
  • Daniel Horvath
  • Jonathan K. Osborne
  • Brittney Wojtaszek
Original Article

Abstract

This investigation examined patient–provider communication about sexual health related to gender and age. Data were collected from 277 individuals, aged 18–60, via convenience and snowball sampling at a large university in southwestern United States. Results indicate women are more proactive about their sexual health than men and tested for STDs more frequently. Women, more than men, initiate discussions with their healthcare provider about sexual health matters and healthcare providers are more likely to initiate communication about such matters with women than men. Men hold stronger gender-stereotypical beliefs than women, are less likely to initiate conversations about sexual issues with their provider, and believe sexual discussions with their partner are inappropriate. Age relates to sexual activity initiation and perceived STD risk.

Keywords

Patient Provider Sexual health Gender Age 

Notes

Acknowledgement

The authors wish to thank Danielle Jackson for her assistance on this project and the helpful reviewer and editor comments.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tara M. Emmers-Sommer
    • 1
  • Sarah Nebel
    • 1
  • Mae-Li Allison
    • 1
  • Michele L. Cannella
    • 1
  • Desiree Cartmill
    • 1
  • Sarah Ewing
    • 1
  • Daniel Horvath
    • 1
  • Jonathan K. Osborne
    • 1
  • Brittney Wojtaszek
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Communication StudiesUniversity of NevadaLas VegasUSA

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