Sex Roles

, Volume 60, Issue 9–10, pp 682–693 | Cite as

Your Sexism Predicts My Sexism: Perceptions of Men’s (but not Women’s) Sexism Affects One’s Own Sexism Over Time

  • Chris G. Sibley
  • Nickola C. Overall
  • John Duckitt
  • Ryan Perry
  • Taciano L. Milfont
  • Sammyh S. Khan
  • Ronald Fischer
  • Andrew Robertson
Original Article

Abstract

The effects of perceived normative (societal) levels of benevolent (BS) and hostile sexism (HS) on one’s own sexist attitudes were examined over a four-month period in an undergraduate New Zealand sample (76 women, 26 men). Perceptions of normative levels of men’s BS produced longitudinal change in one’s own BS, and this effect was invariant across gender. However, contrary to previous research suggesting that women endorse BS when men are high in HS for its protective benefits, women instead expressed subjectively positive paternalistic attitudes toward their gender to the extent that they perceived BS as normative in men. The transmission of patriarchical-defined ideologies is tempered by the degree to which such ideologies espouse benevolent versus more overtly hostile attitudes toward women.

Keywords

Ambivalent sexism Hostile sexism Benevolent sexism System-justification theory Longitudinal 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Chris G. Sibley
    • 1
  • Nickola C. Overall
    • 1
  • John Duckitt
    • 1
  • Ryan Perry
    • 1
  • Taciano L. Milfont
    • 2
  • Sammyh S. Khan
    • 2
  • Ronald Fischer
    • 2
  • Andrew Robertson
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of AucklandAucklandNew Zealand
  2. 2.Victoria University of WellingtonWellingtonNew Zealand

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