Sex Roles

, Volume 58, Issue 9–10, pp 721–728 | Cite as

Identity in Action: Predictors of Feminist Self-Identification and Collective Action

  • Jaclyn A. Nelson
  • Miriam Liss
  • Mindy J. Erchull
  • Molly M. Hurt
  • Laura R. Ramsey
  • Dixie L. Turner
  • Megan E. Haines
Original Article

Abstract

The present study sought to explore how women's life experiences influenced their beliefs, and how those beliefs in turn influenced feminist self-identification. Additionally, we sought to determine whether feminist self-identification led to increased collective action on behalf of women. Female participants (N = 282) from two US college campuses and online listservs completed an online survey assessing feminist self-identification, collective action, and life experiences. Conservative, liberal, and radical beliefs were assessed as were evaluations of feminists. A structural equation model was used to explore these relationships; life experiences were found to influence women's beliefs, which in turn influenced feminist self-identification, which influenced collective action. We found that life experiences may serve as a catalyst for both feminist self-identification and collective action.

Keywords

Feminist identity Collective action Women’s studies Experienced sexism Feminist beliefs 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jaclyn A. Nelson
    • 1
  • Miriam Liss
    • 1
  • Mindy J. Erchull
    • 1
  • Molly M. Hurt
    • 1
  • Laura R. Ramsey
    • 1
  • Dixie L. Turner
    • 1
  • Megan E. Haines
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of Mary WashingtonFredericksburgUSA

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