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Sex Roles

, Volume 57, Issue 1–2, pp 131–136 | Cite as

How Ambivalent Sexism Toward Women and Men Support Rape Myth Acceptance

  • Kristine M. Chapleau
  • Debra L. Oswald
  • Brenda L. Russell
Original Article

Abstract

The goal of this study was to determine how ambivalent sexism toward women and men are both associated with rape myth acceptance. The Illinois Rape Myth Acceptance scale, Ambivalent Sexism Inventory, and Ambivalence toward Men Inventory were completed by 409 participants. Hostile sexism toward women positively correlated with rape myth acceptance. For benevolent sexism toward women, complementary gender differentiation was positively associated with rape myth acceptance whereas protective paternalism was negatively associated. Benevolent sexism toward men, but not hostile sexism, positively correlated with rape myth acceptance. Further, for female participants higher maternalism toward men corresponded with higher rape myth acceptance. These findings suggest that sexist beliefs toward both women and men are important for understanding the support of rape myths.

Keywords

Rape myths Ambivalent sexism toward women Ambivalent sexism toward men 

Notes

Acknowledgements

The results of this study were presented at the annual meeting of the Midwestern Psychological Association (2006, May). The authors thank Kara Lindstedt, Angela Pirlott, and Sara Thimsen for their assistance with data collection.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kristine M. Chapleau
    • 1
  • Debra L. Oswald
    • 1
  • Brenda L. Russell
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyMarquette UniversityMilwaukeeUSA
  2. 2.Pennsylvania State—BerksReadingUSA

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