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Sex Roles

, Volume 56, Issue 5–6, pp 297–308 | Cite as

Beliefs in Equality for Women and Men as Related to Economic Factors in Central and Eastern Europe and the United States

  • Josephine E. Olson
  • Irene H. Frieze
  • Sally Wall
  • Bozena Zdaniuk
  • Anuška Ferligoj
  • Tina Kogovšek
  • Jasna Horvat
  • Nataša Šarlija
  • Eva Jarošová
  • Daniela Pauknerová
  • Lan Anh Nguyen Luu
  • Mònika Kovacs
  • Jolanta Miluska
  • Aida Orgocka
  • Ludmila Erokhina
  • Olga V. Mitina
  • Ludmila V. Popova
  • Nijolė Petkevičiūtė
  • Mirjana Pejic-Bach
  • Slavka Kubušová
  • Maja Rus Makovec
Original Article

Abstract

Do economic indicators predict the general level of support for gender equality? This question was investigated in a sample of countries in Central and Eastern Europe, a region that has been undergoing rapid economic changes since the early 1990s. In this overall sample of male and female college students from ten countries, including the United States as a comparison, the predicted association between stronger beliefs in gender role egalitarianism and positive economic factors was generally supported. Also, consistent with other research, women were more in support of gender equality than men were. There was no support for a predicted trend in less support for gender equality over the time period of the present study.

Keywords

Gender attitudes Central and eastern Europe Economics 

Notes

Acknowledgements

The authors thank Janna Korobanova and Nadejda Sukhareva, formerly at Moscow Pedagogical State University, Russia, for their assistance with data collection in Saransk.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Josephine E. Olson
    • 1
  • Irene H. Frieze
    • 1
  • Sally Wall
    • 1
  • Bozena Zdaniuk
    • 1
  • Anuška Ferligoj
    • 2
  • Tina Kogovšek
    • 2
  • Jasna Horvat
    • 3
  • Nataša Šarlija
    • 3
  • Eva Jarošová
    • 4
  • Daniela Pauknerová
    • 4
  • Lan Anh Nguyen Luu
    • 5
  • Mònika Kovacs
    • 5
  • Jolanta Miluska
    • 6
  • Aida Orgocka
    • 7
  • Ludmila Erokhina
    • 8
  • Olga V. Mitina
    • 9
  • Ludmila V. Popova
    • 10
  • Nijolė Petkevičiūtė
    • 11
  • Mirjana Pejic-Bach
    • 12
  • Slavka Kubušová
    • 13
  • Maja Rus Makovec
    • 14
  1. 1.University of PittsburghPittsburghUSA
  2. 2.University of LjubljanaLjubljanaSlovenia
  3. 3.University of OsijekOsijekCroatia
  4. 4.University of EconomicsPragueCzech Republic
  5. 5.Eotvos Lorand University of BudapestBudapestHungary
  6. 6.Adam Mickiewicz UniversityPoznanPoland
  7. 7.University of New YorkTiranaAlbania
  8. 8.Vladivostok State University of EconomicsVladivostokRussia
  9. 9.Moscow State UniversityMoscowRussia
  10. 10.Moscow Pedagogical State UniversityMoscowRussia
  11. 11.Vytautas Magnus UniversityKaunasLithuania
  12. 12.University of ZagrebZagrebCroatia
  13. 13.Comenius UniversityBratislavaSlovakia
  14. 14.University Psychiatric Hospital LjubljanaLjubljanaSlovenia

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