Sex Roles

, Volume 54, Issue 9–10, pp 603–614

Is Traditional Gender Ideology Associated with Sex-Typed Mate Preferences? A Test in Nine Nations

  • Paul W. Eastwick
  • Alice H. Eagly
  • Peter Glick
  • Mary C. Johannesen-Schmidt
  • Susan T. Fiske
  • Ashley M. B. Blum
  • Thomas Eckes
  • Patricia Freiburger
  • Li-li Huang
  • Maria Lameiras Fernández
  • Anna Maria Manganelli
  • Jolynn C. X. Pek
  • Yolanda Rodríguez Castro
  • Nuray Sakalli-Ugurlu
  • Iris Six-Materna
  • Chiara Volpato
Original Article

DOI: 10.1007/s11199-006-9027-x

Cite this article as:
Eastwick, P.W., Eagly, A.H., Glick, P. et al. Sex Roles (2006) 54: 603. doi:10.1007/s11199-006-9027-x

Abstract

Social role theory (Eagly, Wood, & Diekman, 2000) predicts that traditional gender ideology is associated with preferences for qualities in a mate that reflect a conventional homemaker-provider division of labor. This study assessed traditional gender ideology using Glick and Fiske's (1996, 1999) indexes of ambivalent attitudes toward women and men and related these attitudes to the sex-typed mate preferences of men for younger mates with homemaker skills and of women for older mates with breadwinning potential. Results from a nine-nation sample revealed that, to the extent that participants had a traditional gender ideology, they exhibited greater sex-typing of mate preferences. These relations were generally stable across the nine nations.

Keywords

Mate preferences Ambivalent sexism Cross-cultural Mate selection Gender 

Copyright information

© Springer Science + Business Media, Inc. 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Paul W. Eastwick
    • 1
  • Alice H. Eagly
    • 1
  • Peter Glick
    • 2
  • Mary C. Johannesen-Schmidt
    • 3
  • Susan T. Fiske
    • 4
  • Ashley M. B. Blum
    • 5
  • Thomas Eckes
    • 6
  • Patricia Freiburger
    • 5
  • Li-li Huang
    • 7
  • Maria Lameiras Fernández
    • 8
  • Anna Maria Manganelli
    • 9
  • Jolynn C. X. Pek
    • 10
  • Yolanda Rodríguez Castro
    • 11
  • Nuray Sakalli-Ugurlu
    • 12
  • Iris Six-Materna
    • 13
  • Chiara Volpato
    • 14
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyNorthwestern UniversityEvanstonUSA
  2. 2.Department of PsychologyLawrence UniversityAppletonUSA
  3. 3.Department of Behavioral and Social SciencesOakton Community CollegeDes PlainesUSA
  4. 4.Department of PsychologyPrinceton UniversityPrincetonUSA
  5. 5.Lawrence UniversityAppletonUSA
  6. 6.TestDaF Institute, University of HagenHagenGermany
  7. 7.Center for General EducationNational Tsing Hua UniversityHsinchuTaiwan
  8. 8.Department of Psychosocial and Educational Analysis and InterventionUniversidad de VigoVigo (Pontevedra)Spain
  9. 9.Department of General PsychologyUniversità di PadovaPadovaItaly
  10. 10.Department of PsychologyNational University of SingaporeSingaporeSingapore
  11. 11.Department of Psychosocial and Educational Analysis and InterventionUniversidad de VigoVigo (Pontevedra)Spain
  12. 12.Department of PsychologyMiddle East Technical UniversityAnkaraTurkey
  13. 13.Department of PsychologyChemnitz University of TechnologyChemnitzGermany
  14. 14.Department of PsychologyUniversità di Milano-BicoccaMilanoItaly

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