Sex Roles

, Volume 52, Issue 5–6, pp 369–378 | Cite as

When Gender Differences Surpass Cultural Differences in Personal Satisfaction with Body Shape in Israeli College Students

  • Marilyn P. Safir
  • Shimrit Flaisher-Kellner
  • Amir Rosenmann
Article

Abstract

This study was designed to examine influences of gender and cultural background on participants’ satisfaction with body-shape. Participants were Jewish and Arab university students (104 men and 96 women), who completed the Figure Rating Scale (Fallon & Rozin, 1985). Discrepancy between current and ideal figures was used to measure body satisfaction. As in the U.S., women, in comparison with men, were significantly less satisfied with their bodies. They exaggerated the magnitude of thinness that they thought men desire. In contrast with U.S. findings, there were women as well as men, who indicated dissatisfaction with their bodies because they thought they were too thin. Contrary to our predictions, cultural background did not influence body satisfaction. However, gender and age produced significant differences in ratings.

Keywords

gender difference cultural differences body image Israel 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science + Business Media, Inc. 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Marilyn P. Safir
    • 1
    • 2
  • Shimrit Flaisher-Kellner
    • 1
  • Amir Rosenmann
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of HaifaIsrael
  2. 2.Department of PsychologyUniversity of HaifaIsrael

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