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Dating and Courtship Behaviors Among Those with Autism Spectrum Disorder

  • Melanie Clark MogaveroEmail author
  • Ko-Hsin Hsu
Brief Report

Abstract

There has been growing concern among stakeholders about individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), their sexual and intimate relationship experience, and their ability to pursue and maintain interpersonal relationships in a healthy manner. ASD is characterized, in part, by communication and socialization deficits, which may lead to miscommunications, inappropriate communications, or inappropriate actions towards romantic interests. This study sought to describe the romantic experiences of a small sample of individuals with ASD and explore any inappropriate courtship behaviors while pursuing a romantic interest.

Keywords

Autism spectrum disorder Sexuality Dating Stalking Harassment United States 

Notes

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declared no potential conflicts of interest with respect to the research, authorship, and/or publication of this article.

Human and Animal Rights

All procedures performed in studies involving human participants were in accordance with the ethical standards of the institutional and/or national research committee and with the 1964 Helsinki declaration and its later amendments or comparable ethical standards.

Informed Consent

Informed consent was obtained electronically from all individual participants included in the study.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Criminal JusticeGeorgian Court UniversityLakewoodUSA
  2. 2.Department of Criminal JusticeKutztown University of PennsylvaniaKutztownUSA

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