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What I have learned from my Google Scholar and H index

  • Adrian FurnhamEmail author
Article

Abstract

Following Hartley (Scientometrics 118:375–381, 2019) I attempted to draw lessons from my personal Google citations (> 100,000) by reviewing over 100,000 personal citations. The review asked eight questions: Do papers in high impact journals necessarily lead to higher personal citations? Does innovative research attract more citations than replications and refinement? Do reviews and meta-analysis attract more citations than empirical studies? Which gets cited more: books, chapters, presentations, chapters? What determines the pattern of individual paper citations over time? Do citations vary across academic disciplines? Is it better to focus on a few specific journals or “spread-the-word” to maximize citations? How important is it to devise one’s own tests (statistical/diagnostic) to maximize citations? All these questions were answered by inspecting this N = 1 data set. It provides hypotheses for other researchers to explore and test. Limitations are acknowledged.

Keywords

Personal citations Scientometrics Books versus papers Academic disciplines Advice 

References

  1. Diener, E., Oishi, S., & Park, J. (2014). An incomplete list of eminent psychologists of the modern era. Archives of Scientific Psychology,2, 20–32.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Hartley, J. (2017). Authors and their citations: A point of view. Scientometrics,110(2), 1081–1084.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Hartley, J. (2019). Some reflections on being cited 10,000 times. Scientometrics,118, 375–381.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Rushton, J. P. (2001). A scientometric appreciation of H. J. Eysenck’s contributions to psychology. Personality and Individual Differences,31, 17–39.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Akadémiai Kiadó, Budapest, Hungary 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Norwegian Business SchoolNydalen, OlsoNorway

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