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Scientometrics

, Volume 79, Issue 1, pp 201–218 | Cite as

Response Surface Methodology and its application in evaluating scientific activity

  • Evaristo Jiménez-Contreras
  • Daniel Torres-Salinas
  • Rafael Bailón Moreno
  • Rosario Ruiz Baños
  • Emilio Delgado López-Cózar
Article

Abstract

The possibilities of the Response Surface Methodology (RSM) has been explored within the ambit of Scientific Activity Analysis. The case of the system “Departments of the Area of Health Sciences of the University of Navarre (Spain)” has been studied in relation to the system “Scientific Community in the Health Sciences”, from the perspective of input/output models (factors/response). It is concluded that the RSM reveals the causal relationships between factors and responses through the construction of polynomial mathematical models. Similarly, quasiexperimental designs are proposed, these permitting scientific activity to be analysed with minimum effort and cost and high accuracy.

Keywords

Response Surface Response Surface Methodology Central Composite Design Scientific Production Scientific Activity 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Evaristo Jiménez-Contreras
    • 1
  • Daniel Torres-Salinas
    • 1
    • 2
  • Rafael Bailón Moreno
    • 1
  • Rosario Ruiz Baños
    • 1
  • Emilio Delgado López-Cózar
    • 1
  1. 1.Evaluación de la Ciencia y la Comunicación Científica, Facultad de Communicatión y Documentación Departamento de Biblioteconomía y DocumentaciónUniversidad de GranadaGranadaSpain
  2. 2.Centro de Investigación Médica Apicada (CIMA)Universidad de NavarraPamplonaSpain

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