Research in Science Education

, 35:269

Science Curriculum Components Favored by Taiwanese Biology Teachers

Article

Abstract

The new 1–9 curriculum framework in Taiwan provides a remarkable change from previous frameworks in terms of the coverage of content and the powers of teachers. This study employs a modified repertory grid technique to investigate biology teachers' preferences with regard to six curriculum components. One hundred and eighty-five in-service and pre-service biology teachers were asked to determine which science curriculum components they liked and disliked most of all to include in their biology classes. The data show that the rank order of these science curriculum components, from top to bottom, was as follows: application of science, manipulation skills, scientific concepts, social/ethical issues, problem-solving skills, and the history of science. They also showed that pre-service biology teachers, as compared with in-service biology teachers, favored problem-solving skills significantly more than manipulative skills, while in-service biology teachers, as compared with pre-service biology teachers, favored manipulative skills significantly more than problem-solving skills. Some recommendations for ensuring the successful implementation of the Taiwanese 1–9 curriculum framework are also proposed.

Keywords

curriculum science education teacher education 

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Copyright information

© Springer 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.National Taiwan Normal UniversityTaiwan
  2. 2.Chung Kuo Institute of TechnologyTaiwan
  3. 3.TaipeiTaiwan

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