Research in Higher Education

, Volume 50, Issue 5, pp 483–501

Faculty Emphases on Alternative Course-Specific Learning Outcomes in Holland’s Model Environments: The Role of Environmental Consistency

  • John C. Smart
  • Corinna A. Ethington
  • Paul D. Umbach
  • Louis M. Rocconi
Article

Abstract

This study examines variability in the extent to which faculty members in the disciplinary-based academic environments of Holland’s theory emphasize different student learning outcomes in their classes and whether such differences are comparable for those in “consistent” versus “inconsistent” environments. The findings show wide variation in the extent to which faculty members in four of the academic environments of Holland’s theory emphasize the alternative student learning outcomes and that such differences vary based on the level of consistency or inconsistency in the environmental profiles of the environments. The implications of these findings for future research using Holland’s theory to understand longitudinal patterns of change and stability in the attitudes, interests, and abilities of college students as well as variability in the patterns of professional attitudes and behaviors of college faculty are discussed. Attention is also devoted to the policy development and practical implications of these findings for academic advisors, career counselors, and other college and university leaders.

Keywords

Academic environments College environments College faculty College impacts College teaching Holland’s theory 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • John C. Smart
    • 1
  • Corinna A. Ethington
    • 1
  • Paul D. Umbach
    • 2
  • Louis M. Rocconi
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Counseling, Educational, Psychology and ResearchThe University of MemphisMemphisUSA
  2. 2.College of EducationNorth Carolina State UniversityRaleighUSA

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