Res Publica

, Volume 19, Issue 4, pp 317–333 | Cite as

Moral Character for Political Leaders: A Normative Account

Article
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Abstract

This article analyzes the moral and political implications of strong moral character for political action. The treatment provides reason to hold that strong moral character should play a role in a robust normative account of political leadership. The case is supported by empirical findings on character dispositions and the political viability of the account’s normative prescriptions.

Keywords

Leadership Character Politics Morality Ethics Democracy 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The author wishes to thank Eric Beerbohm, Stephen Brooks, William Galston, Robert Goodin, Nannerl Keohane, Seth Lazar, Alice Liou, Stephen Macedo, Mara Marin, Michael Morrell, Russell Muirhead, James Bernard Murphy, Joseph Reisert, Nancy Rosenblum, Andrew Sabl, Dennis Thompson, Jeffrey Tulis, Benjamin Valentino, Daniel Viehoff, William Wohlforth, and the editors and referees of this journal for helpful commentary on earlier versions of this article. Research for this article was generously supported by Dartmouth's Institute for the Study of Applied and Professional Ethics.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of GovernmentDartmouth CollegeHanoverUSA

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