A green chemical approach for the synthesis of gold nanoparticles: characterization and mechanistic aspect

Project Update

Abstract

This IRCSET-EMPOWER (Irish Research Council for Science, Engineering and Technology Postdoctoral Research Grant) project aims to improve current methodology for the synthesis of metal nanoparticles (NPs). The development of efficient methodology for metal nanomaterials synthesis is an economical and environmental challenge. While the current methods for NPs synthesis are often energy-intensive and involve toxic chemicals, NPs biosynthesis can be carried on at circumneutral pH and mild temperature, resulting in low cost and environmental impact. Nanomaterial biosynthesis has been already observed in magnetotactic bacteria, diatoms, and S-layer bacteria, however, controlled NPs biosynthesis is a relatively new area of research with considerable potential for development. A thorough understanding of the biochemical mechanism involved in NPs biosynthesis is needed, before biosynthetic methods can be economically competitive. The analysis and identification of active species in the nucleation and growth of metal NPs is a daunting task, due to the complexity of the microbial system. This project work focuses on the controlled biosynthesis of gold NPs by fungal microorganisms and aims to determine the biochemical mechanism involved in nucleation and growth of the particles.

Keywords

Nanobiotechnology Gold nanoparticles Microbial synthesis Living nanofactory Green chemical approach 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of BiotechnologyDublin City UniversityDublin 9Ireland

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