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Application, eco-physiology and biodiversity of anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing bacteria

  • Boran Kartal
  • Laura van Niftrik
  • Olav Sliekers
  • Markus C. Schmid
  • Ingo Schmidt
  • Katinka van de Pas-Schoonen
  • Irina Cirpus
  • Wouter van der Star
  • Mark van Loosdrecht
  • Wiebe Abma
  • J. Gijs Kuenen
  • Jan-Willem Mulder
  • Mike S. M. Jetten
  • Huub Op den Camp
  • Marc Strous
  • Jack van de Vossenberg
Article

Abstract

The demand for new and sustainable systems for nitrogen removal has increased dramatically in the last decade. It is clear that the conventional systems cannot deal with the increasing nitrogen loads in a cost effective way. As an alternative, the implementation of the anammox (anaerobic ammonium oxidation) process in the treatment of wastewater with high ammonium concentrations has been started. The compact anammox reactors can sustain high nitrogen loads without any problems. The highest observed anammox capacity is 8.9 kg N removed m-3 reactor day-1. The first 75 m3 anammox reactor is operating in Rotterdam, the Netherlands, combined with the partial nitrification process Single reaction system for High Ammonium Removal Over Nitrite (SHARON). Partial nitrification and anammox can also be combined in one reactor systems like Completely Autotrophic Nitrogen removal Over Nitrite (CANON) or Oxygen Limited Ammonium removal via Nitrification Denitrification (OLAND) where aerobic ammonium-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and anammox bacteria cooperate under oxygen-limitation. These systems remove about 1.5 kg N m-3 reactor day-1. In addition to ammonium, urea can also be converted in the CANON system after a two-week adaptation period. The ecophysiological properties of the anammox bacteria make them very well suited to convert ammonium and nitrite. The Ks values for ammonium and nitrite are below 5 μM. However, nitrite above 10 mM is detrimental for the anammox process, and oxygen reversibly inhibits the process at concentrations as low as 1 μM. Acetate and propionate can be used by the anammox bacteria to convert nitrite and nitrate, whereas methanol and ethanol severely inhibit the anammox reaction. The enzyme hydroxylamine/hydrazine oxidoreductase (HAO), one of the key enzymes, is located in the anammoxosome, which is a membrane bound organelle. The membranes of the anammox bacteria contain unique ladderane lipids and hopanoids. The bacteria responsible for the anammox reaction are related to the Planctomycetes. The first anammox bacteria were isolated via Percoll centrifugation and characterized as Candidatus “Brocadia anammoxidans”. Survey of different wastewater treatment plants using anammox specific 16S rRNA gene primers and anammox specific oligonucleotide probes has revealed the presence of at least three other anammox bacteria, which have been tentatively named Candidatus “Kuenenia stuttgartiensis”, Candidatus “Scalindua wagneri” and Candidatus “Scalindua brodae”. A close relative of the latter, Candidatus “Scalindua sorokinii” was found to be responsible for about 50% of the nitrogen conversion in the anoxic zone of the Black Sea, making the anammox bacteria an important player in the oceanic nitrogen cycle.

Keywords

Anammox Brocadia denitrification nitrification nitrite nitrogen removal planctomycetes 16S rRNA gene urea 

Abbreviations

ANAMMOX

anaerobic ammonium oxidation

AOB

aerobic ammonium-oxidizing bacteria

CANON

completely autotrophic nitrogen removal over nitrite

NOB

nitrite-oxidizing bacteria

OLAND

oxygen limited ammonium removal via nitrification denitrification

RBC

rotating biological contactor

SHARON

Single reactor system for high ammonium removal over nitrite

SBR

sequencing batch reactor

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Copyright information

© Springer 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Boran Kartal
    • 1
  • Laura van Niftrik
    • 2
  • Olav Sliekers
    • 2
  • Markus C. Schmid
    • 1
    • 2
  • Ingo Schmidt
    • 1
    • 5
  • Katinka van de Pas-Schoonen
    • 1
  • Irina Cirpus
    • 2
  • Wouter van der Star
    • 2
  • Mark van Loosdrecht
    • 2
  • Wiebe Abma
    • 3
  • J. Gijs Kuenen
    • 2
  • Jan-Willem Mulder
    • 4
  • Mike S. M. Jetten
    • 1
    • 2
  • Huub Op den Camp
    • 1
  • Marc Strous
    • 1
  • Jack van de Vossenberg
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Microbiology, Institute for Water and Wetland Research, , , , Radboud University NijmegenNijmegenThe Netherlands
  2. 2.Department of BiotechnologyTU DelftDelft
  3. 3.Paques BV BalkNL
  4. 4.ZHEWDordrechtNL
  5. 5.Department of MicrobiologyUniversity of BayreuthGermany

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