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Reviews in Endocrine and Metabolic Disorders

, Volume 7, Issue 3, pp 205–213 | Cite as

The renaissance of insulin pump treatment in childhood type 1 diabetes

  • William V. TamborlaneEmail author
  • Karena Swan
  • Kristin A. Sikes
  • Amy T. Steffen
  • Stuart A Weinzimer
Article

Abstract

Current goals for the treatment of children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus include achieving near-normal blood sugar levels, minimizing the risk of hypoglycemia, optimizing quality of life, and preventing or delaying long-term microvascular and macrovascular complications. Continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII), or insulin pump therapy, provides a treatment option that can assist in the attainment of all of these goals in all ages of children. In pediatric patients, CSII has been demonstrated to reduce both glycosylated hemoglobin levels and frequency of severe hypoglycemia, without sacrifices in safety, quality of life, or weight gain, particularly in conjunction with the use of new insulin analogs and improvements in pump technology. Clinical studies of safety and efficacy of CSII in children are reviewed, as well as criteria for patient selection and practical considerations using pump therapy in youth with T1DM.

Keywords

Continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion Pump therapy Hypoglycemia 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • William V. Tamborlane
    • 1
    • 2
    Email author
  • Karena Swan
    • 1
    • 2
  • Kristin A. Sikes
    • 1
    • 2
  • Amy T. Steffen
    • 1
    • 2
  • Stuart A Weinzimer
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.General Clinical Research CenterYale University School of MedicineNew HavenUSA
  2. 2.Department of PediatricsYale University School of MedicineNew HavenUSA

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