Advertisement

On positive mysterianism

  • Dale TuggyEmail author
Article

Abstract

Religious believers react in one of four ways to apparent contradictions among their beliefs: Redirection, Resistance, Restraint, or Resolution. This paper evaluates positive mysterian Resistance, the view that believers may rationally believe and know apparently contradictory religious doctrines. After locating this theory by comparing and contrasting it with others, I explore the best developed version of it, that of James Anderson’s Paradox in Christian Theology. I argue that it faces steep epistemic problems, and is at best a temporarily reasonable but ultimately unsustainable stance.

Keywords

Mystery Contradiction Trinity Incarnation Paradox Defeaters Christianity Theology 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Anderson J. (2007) Paradox in Christian theology: An analysis of its presence, character, and epistemic status. Paternoster, Waynesboro, GAGoogle Scholar
  2. Basinger D. (1987) Biblical paradox: Does revelation challenge logic? Journal of the Evangelical Theological Society 30(2): 205–213Google Scholar
  3. Cullison, A. (forthcoming). What are seemings? Ratio.Google Scholar
  4. Elga A. (2010) How to disagree about how to disagree. In: Feldman R., Warfield T. (eds) Disagreement. Oxford University Press, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  5. Koller J. (2007) Asian philosophies (5th ed.). Pearson Prentice Hall, Upper Saddle River, NJGoogle Scholar
  6. Plantinga A. (1999) On Heresy, mind, and truth. Faith and Philosophy 16(2): 182–193Google Scholar
  7. Plantinga A. (2000) Warranted Christian belief. Oxford University Press, New YorkCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Priest G. (2002) Beyond the limits of thought (2nd ed.). Oxford University Press, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  9. Priest, G., Beall, J. C., Armour-Garb, B. (eds) (2004) The law of non-contradiction: New philosophical essays. Oxford University Press, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  10. Reid, T. (1872) [1785]. Essays on the intellectual powers of man. In W. Hamilton (Ed.), The works of Thomas Reid, D.D. (Vol. I, pp. 219–508). Edinburgh: MacLachlan and Stewart.Google Scholar
  11. Tanner, N. (eds) (1990) Decrees of the ecumenical councils II. Georgetown University Press, Washington, DCGoogle Scholar
  12. Tuggy D. (2003) The unfinished business of trinitarian theorizing. Religious Studies 39: 165–183Google Scholar
  13. Tuggy D. (2009a) Review of James Anderson’s paradox in Christian theology: An analysis of its presence, character, and epistemic status. Faith and Philosophy 26(1): 104–108Google Scholar
  14. Tuggy, D. (2009b). Trinity. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy. http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/trinity/. Cited 9 February 2010.
  15. Willard D. (2009) Knowing Christ today. HarperOne, New YorkGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of PhilosophySUNY FredoniaFredoniaUSA

Personalised recommendations