Review of Economics of the Household

, Volume 11, Issue 2, pp 193–209 | Cite as

Effects of child support pass-through and disregard policies on in-kind child support

Article

Abstract

This paper examines whether states’ elimination of child support disregards for welfare payments after welfare reform caused non-custodial parents to increase in-kind support. I use longitudinal data from the Survey of Program Dynamics and take advantage of state and year variation in child support disregard policies before and after the 1996 welfare reform to identify effects of the disregard on in-kind support. I find that a $100 decrease in the disregard corresponds to a 3.2 percentage point increase in the probability a child will receive in-kind child support.

Keywords

Child support In-kind payments Welfare reform Disregard 

JEL Classification

H75 I38 J12 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of EconomicsColby CollegeWatervilleUSA

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