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Quality of Life Research

, Volume 23, Issue 10, pp 2673–2680 | Cite as

Physical activity and health-related quality of life: US adults with and without limitations

  • David R. Brown
  • Dianna D. Carroll
  • Lauren M. Workman
  • Susan A. Carlson
  • David W. Brown
Article

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to examine the dose–response relationship between physical activity (PA) and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) among adults with and without limitations.

Methods

We dichotomized HRQOL as ≥14 unhealthy (physical or mental) days (past 30 days), or <14 unhealthy days. By using a moderate-intensity minute equivalent, PA categories were as follows: inactive, 10–60, 61–149, 150–300, and >300 min/week. Persons with limitations reported having problems that limited their activities or required use of special equipment. Age-adjusted prevalence estimates and logistic regression analyses were performed with 2009 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System data (n = 357,665), controlling for demographics, BMI, smoking, and heavy alcohol use.

Results

For adults without limitations, the odds of ≥14 unhealthy days were lower among adults obtaining any PA (10–60 min/week, AOR = 0.79, 95 % CI 0.70, 0.88), compared with those inactive. A quadratic trend (P < 0.001) indicated enhanced HRQOL with each PA level, but improvements were less marked between lower and upper sufficient PA categories (150-300 and >300 min/week). Because of a significant age interaction, persons with limitations were stratified by age (18–34, 35–64, and 65+ years). Findings for persons aged 35 years or older with limitations were similar to those without limitations. Lower odds of poor HRQOL for persons aged 18–34 years with limitations were associated with recommended levels of PA (150–300 min/week; AOR = 0.61, 95 % CI 0.43, 0.88 and >300 min/week; AOR = 0.58, 95 % CI 0.43, 0.80).

Conclusions

PA is positively associated with HRQOL among persons with and without limitations.

Keywords

Exercise Well-being Unhealthy days Disability status 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The authors have no funding sources to declare that may bias reporting of the findings and conclusion of the study. The authors do not have any professional relationships with companies or manufacturers that would benefit from the results of the present study. The findings and conclusions in this report are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official position of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland(out side the USA) 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • David R. Brown
    • 1
  • Dianna D. Carroll
    • 2
  • Lauren M. Workman
    • 3
  • Susan A. Carlson
    • 1
  • David W. Brown
    • 4
  1. 1.Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity and ObesityCenters for Disease Control and PreventionAtlantaUSA
  2. 2.Division of Human Development and Disability, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Commissioned CorpsU.S. Public Health ServiceAtlantaUSA
  3. 3.Department of Health Promotion, Education and Behavior, Arnold School of Public HealthUniversity of South CarolinaColumbiaUSA
  4. 4.The Brown Consulting GroupCharlotteUSA

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