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Quality of Life Research

, Volume 21, Issue 8, pp 1347–1357 | Cite as

Association between adherence to physical activity guidelines and health-related quality of life among individuals with physician-diagnosed arthritis

  • Shamly Austin
  • Haiyan Qu
  • Richard M. ShewchukEmail author
Article

Abstract

Purpose

To examine the association between adherence to physical activity guidelines and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) among individuals with arthritis.

Methods

A cross-sectional sample with 33,071 US adults, 45 years or older with physician-diagnosed arthritis was obtained from 2007 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System survey. We conducted negative binomial regression analysis to examine HRQOL as a function of adherence to physical activity guidelines controlling for physicians’ recommendations for physical activity, age, sex, race, education, marital status, employment, annual income, health insurance, personal physician, emotional support, body mass index, activity limitations, health status, and co-morbidities based on Behavioral Model of Health Services Utilization.

Results

Descriptive statistics showed that 60% adults with arthritis did not adhere to physical activity guidelines, mean physically and mentally unhealthy days were 7.7 and 4.4 days, respectively. Results from negative binomial regression indicated that individuals who did not adhere to physical activity guidelines had 1.14 days more physically unhealthy days and 1.12 days more mentally unhealthy days than those who adhered controlling for covariates.

Conclusions

Adherence to physical activity is important to improve HRQOL for individuals with arthritis. However, adherence is low among this population. Interventions are required to engage individuals with arthritis in physical activity.

Keywords

Arthritis Physical activity Adherence Health-related quality of life 

Abbreviations

ACR

American College of Rheumatology

BMI

Body mass index

BRFSS

Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System

CDC

Centers for Diseases Control and Prevention

HRQOL

Health-related quality of life

SPSS

Statistical Package for Social Sciences

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Shamly Austin
    • 1
  • Haiyan Qu
    • 2
  • Richard M. Shewchuk
    • 3
    Email author
  1. 1.Department of Health Services AdministrationUniversity of Alabama at BirminghamBirminghamUSA
  2. 2.Department of Health Services AdministrationUniversity of Alabama at BirminghamBirminghamUSA
  3. 3.Department of Health Services AdministrationUniversity of Alabama at BirminghamBirminghamUSA

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