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Quality of Life Research

, Volume 16, Issue 7, pp 1239–1249 | Cite as

Reliability and validity of the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory™ (PedsQL™) Short Form 15 Generic Core Scales in Japan

  • Xiaoli Chen
  • Hideki Origasa
  • Fukiko Ichida
  • Keiko Kamibeppu
  • James W. Varni
Article

Abstract

Objective

To assess the reliability and validity of the Japanese translation version of the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory™ 4.0 Short Form 15 (PedsQL™ 4.0 SF15).

Methods

The PedsQL™ 4.0 SF15 was administered to 229 schoolchildren aged 6–13 years and 100 pediatric outpatients aged 5–18 years and their parents.

Results

Internal consistency reliability exceeded 0.70 for both proxy-reported and self-reported scales. Test–retest reliability demonstrated large values for parent proxy-report (range: 0.68–0.79) and moderate to large values for child self-report (range: 0.46–0.73). Parent proxy-report health-related quality of life (HRQOL) was higher than child self-report in all scales except for School Functioning. The correlations between the reports of the parents and children were moderate to high. Gender differences were observed in Social Functioning, School Functioning, and Psychosocial Health Summary, with girls reporting higher HRQOL than boys. Factor analysis indicated that four factors were extracted from the PedsQL™ 4.0 SF15 and these four factors corresponded mainly to the four scales. Known groups validity was established for proxy-report and self-report with higher HRQOL being reported for healthy children than those with psychosomatic complaints including headache and abdominal pain.

Conclusion

The Japanese translation version of the PedsQL™ 4.0 SF15 demonstrates good reliability and validity and could be used as a measure of HRQOL for transcultural comparisons of pediatric research in school settings and healthcare services research.

Keywords

Health-related quality of life Children Healthcare Japan PedsQL™ 

Abbreviations

HRQOL

Health-Related Quality of Life

PedsQL™

Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory™

PedsQL™ 4.0 SF15

Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory™ 4.0 Short Form 15

Notes

Acknowledgements

The authors sincerely thank the children and parents who participated in the study. Special thanks are given to Ms. Nagamori, Ms. Tsubota and her class 2–1. My special thanks are also given to Ms. Mayumi Iwaguchi for her great assistance during the survey period in hospital. Lastly, I thank my daughter Jenny for her helpful comments and support during the study period.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Xiaoli Chen
    • 1
    • 6
  • Hideki Origasa
    • 1
  • Fukiko Ichida
    • 2
  • Keiko Kamibeppu
    • 3
  • James W. Varni
    • 4
    • 5
  1. 1.Faculty of Medicine, Division of Biostatistics and Clinical EpidemiologyUniversity of ToyamaToyamaJapan
  2. 2.Faculty of Medicine, Department of PediatricsUniversity of ToyamaToyamaJapan
  3. 3.Faculty of Medicine, Department of Family NursingUniversity of TokyoTokyoJapan
  4. 4.Department of Pediatrics, College of MedicineTexas A&M UniversityCollege StationUSA
  5. 5.Department of Landscape Architecture and Urban Planning, College of ArchitectureTexas A&M UniversityCollege StationUSA
  6. 6.Center for Human Nutrition, Department of International Health, Bloomberg School of Public HealthJohns Hopkins UniversityBaltimoreUSA

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