Plant Foods for Human Nutrition

, Volume 59, Issue 1, pp 23–27 | Cite as

Fatty Acids and Carotenes in Some Ber (Ziziphus jujuba Mill) Varieties

  • J.L. GUIL-GUERRERO
  • A. DÍAZ DELGADO
  • M.C. MATALLANA GONZÁLEZ
  • M.E. TORIJA ISASA

Abstract

Several jujube varieties from the southeast of Spain were analyzed for fatty acid and carotene contents. Triglycerides having medium-chain fatty acids were most abundant in all samples. The main fatty acids were 12:0 (18.3 ± 9.97), 10:0 (12.5 ± 19.0), 18:2n6 (9.27 ± 7.26), 16:1n7 (8.50 ± 5.77), 16:0 (7.25 ± 4.35), and 18:1n9 (5.34 ± 2.52) on total saponifiable oil. The fruits yield 1.33 ± 0.17 g/100 g saponifiable oil on a dry weight basis. Fatty acid profiles of fruits were found to be influenced by their developmental stage. Multivariable data analyses show that the samples could be grouped on the basis of their fatty acid content. Carotenes were found to be in good agreement with other fruits, varying from 4.12 to 5.98 mg/100 g on a dry weight basis. The contribution to vitamin value reach a mdium of 38 μg RE/100 g on a fresh weight basis.

ber carotenes fatty acid medium-chain fatty acids multivariable data analyses Ziziphus jujuba 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • J.L. GUIL-GUERRERO
    • 1
  • A. DÍAZ DELGADO
    • 2
  • M.C. MATALLANA GONZÁLEZ
    • 1
    • 2
  • M.E. TORIJA ISASA
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Dpto. de Ingeniería Química, Facultad de Ciencias ExperimentalesUniversidad de AlmeríaAlmeríaSpain
  2. 2.Dpto. de Nutrición y Bromatología IIFacultad de Farmacia de la U.C.M.MadridSpain

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