Public Choice

, Volume 144, Issue 3–4, pp 473–486 | Cite as

Turnover of organized crime and money laundering: some preliminary empirical findings

Article

Abstract

After a short literature review, the paper quantifies the turnover of organized crime with the help of a MIMIC estimation procedure for the years 1995 to 2006 for 20 highly developed OECD countries. The volume of turnover from organized crime was US-$ 270 billion in the year 1995 for these 20 OECD countries, rising to $ 614 billion in 2006. The worldwide turnover in organized crime had a value of $ 595 billion in 2001 and rose to $ 790 billion in 2006. These figures are very preliminary but clearly indicate the importance of the turnover of organized crime or the extent of money laundering.

Keywords

Financial means of organized crime Forensic economics Hawala banking MIMIC estimation Money laundering 

JEL Classification

K42 H26 O17 H26 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Johannes Kepler University of LinzLinz-AuhofAustria

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